White Male Privilege A Myth?

The video above shows a fascinating dialogue between “Louder With Crowder” host Steven Crowder and students at Texas Christian University.  It touches on a number of cultural hot topics, like white male privilege, oppression of minorities and women, whether systemic racism/sexism is real, victimhood mentality, acting “white” and factors other than race and gender that determine success.

At first I had it playing in the background while doing some other work.  After a few minutes though, I was completely transfixed and couldn’t pull my eyes away.  Not only from the participants, but from the reactions of the crowd that had gathered to watch, which shifted between prideful smirking, to uncomfortable stillness, to cheering for the other side  as the truth of the words being spoke sunk in.  It was all so captivating.

The first half involves two female college students; one black and one white, who hold the Leftist views you  typically find with young people on a college campus.  The women were pleasant and obviously not stupid,  but their comments were filled with emotionally charged statements with nothing backing them up.  Yet they were adamant that what they were saying was true simply because they believed it to be. To paraphrase:

Our country was built by white males for white males only.

The hardships white men suffer from can never compare to what minorities go through.

Women can never truly get ahead because of sexism.

White male privilege definitely exists.

In the second half we see a discussion with two male students, one black and one Asian.  They talk about actual life experiences and the things they feel have either held them back or helped them to succeed and completely refute everything said by the women before them.  A lot of powerful statements were spoken, but this one really stood out to me for its stark truth:

When you tell people you can’t do anything in life because of this overlord above you that’s oppressing you, you’re not gonna have any optimism, you’re not gonna have any aspirations to achieve anything in life, what’s the point?

Hello hammer, meet nail, this is exactly the problem with victimhood culture.  It’s not merely that it’s annoying to watch extremely privileged people whine about all the things holding them back in life, because it most certainly is.  It’s the corrosive effect this type of “what’s the point” perspective has on a person’s thought process and how they navigate their way in the world.

It’s a national catastrophe really, when you think about how many people are being indoctrinated with this crap in schools around the country.  How much anger and resentment between racial groups and the sexes has this caused and, most tragically, how many lives have gone unfulfilled because this phony racist/sexist bogeyman made people feel it was pointless to even try?

To hear these taboo subjects being discussed so openly and respectfully was just so refreshing compared to the usual nonsense PC jargon we get bombarded with when it comes to race and gender issues.

I know it’s asking a lot of folks to devote an hour of time watching a video.  Cue it up to the 5 minute mark and just play it in the background while you do something else…..

This entry was posted in Free speech, Personal growth, Political, Uncategorized, Women's Empowerment and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

62 Responses to White Male Privilege A Myth?

  1. Sean Mungin says:

    Hi Tricia! This is interesting to me because I literally was having this same conversation about an hour ago. Education is needed…dialogue is needed…change is needed…Thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Good stuff, Tricia!

    This was interesting and true, “When you tell people you can’t do anything in life because of this overlord above you that’s oppressing you……”

    I have my mom living with us and she’s far left and aging. The biggest challenge with her is that I am so not into a victim mentality, never really have been, and yet she can’t stop trying to enforce it. The negativity is just astounding to bear witness to, everyone is allegedly out to get you, to stop you, to limit you. There is always a massive conspiracy lurking in the background trying to take you down.

    You write, “It’s the corrosive effect this type of “what’s the point” perspective has on a person’s thought process and how they navigate their way in the world.” Amen, you’ve nailed it! It’s a corrosive form of brainwashing actually. It creates learned helplessness.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Tricia says:

      Brainwashing is a good word for it IB and I’m so sorry that your mom is that way. It must have been really difficult to grow up dealing with that. It’s interesting that you turned out completely opposite of that, thank God, eh?

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I actually watched the whole thing.. and I can’t say I am thinking that there’s necessarily anything “wrong” here.. regarding the perceptions of these students. What I see is that college campuses appear to be as much the liberal hotbeds of learning as they always have been. I was attending a smaller college (not a university) for a while that had a campus and was subject to all the liberalism influence as any other university campus. This was all during the anti-war movement, civil rights movement, hippie counter-culture movement, defiance of everything and anything originating from politicians and Washington politics. Open displays of campus gatherings bordering on civil unrest were commonplace, with students claiming to have all the answers because they were suddenly possessing some intellectual secrets of the ages that were so logical that they couldn’t understand the “real” world adults had made for them (amazing what those psych and philo classes can do to the mind).
    When my own kids entered the college years, especially my oldest who went to a big university, I told them that I expected them to come home in talk liberal college lingo.. and sure enough they did to some extent. But see, my whole point here is that colleges and universities are not necessarily forcing liberal thought in the classroom as much as young students see the inequalities and struggles of class, race, gender.. as part of learning history; they get to criticize the world because that is their laboratory to do so… and their learning critical thinking skills is a direct result of applying critique to the unequal world around them.
    My own sister, who was four years my younger, was not so dissimilar in her liberal passion as the young lady in the video when she would come home from college and get into these passionate debates-arguments with our father (I’d be off to the side trying to shush her up before dad got pissed).
    I don’t blame the schools.. in fact, I don’t blame anything for the perceptions of life these students have that seems a bit askew to….. real reality. My generation in college knew WE had the answers to all the world’s ills… these kids in the video think the same. Life experiences will temper all that.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Tricia says:

      I hope you’re right Doug about life tempering what I would call learned idiocy. I’ve definitely suffered from it and thought i knew it ALL when I was younger. I think things are different today though and should cause some pause for alarm. What these kids are being taught about white males and the evils of America and ingrained victimhood status starts long before they even get to college and by that time there is 0 tolerance to hearing views that challenge it and quote often the school administration is not only ok with this, but champions that type of intolerance.

      Moderate and very intelligent speakers like Christina Hoff Summers, Ben Shapiro, Charles Murray, etc…are being shouted down and in some cases physically assaulted during campus speech events, with students acting like offensive speech is an actual physical assault, which is absurd. And out in the real world, businesses are becoming more and more Orwellian in what you can and cannot say, just ask the guy that got fired from Google for stating simply that women have different attributes that may make them less apt to go in to engineering jobs.

      As these young people leave college and mature, they will become more ingrained in the corporate and politics world and hold positions of real power where this poisonous philosophy can and will do real damage if it’s not challenged. Corporate executive suites today are filled with people who either think the same way, or who don’t but are terrified of a negative PR campaigned ramped up by angry social justice warriors so they just go along with the insanity.

      Like

      • I think a good comparison might be to reflect on our own past lives.. in college. Not so much from attending a local junior college.. but having to reside at a university where you get involved in the culture. I certainly cannot say one bit that I continued what I thought about worldly things in college, into my adult life. There is no reason to suggest that will ever change. Oddly enough.. we do evolve our thoughts and opinions after a few years attending the School of Hard Knocks.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Social media and the internet have made today’s campus leftism bubbles WAY different than anything in the 20th century. Leftist activism today is a huge political industry. It is truly something to worry about, and not just something to brush away nostalgically as the same ol’ youthful rebelliousness that universities have always fostered. The degree of inequality between identity groups is being exaggerated beyond all sanity, by teaching a system of logic that rhetorically twists everything into an affront to humanity. Why is this happening? Because unrest, envy, and victimhood is the lifeblood of leftism. Saul Alinsky (author of Rules for Radicals in 1971) was a diabolical disruptor of Western moral culture, but his recommended methods sure do work fantastically.

        It seems that our society is probably going to have to crash & burn and have a really painful period of dystopia before this new American leftist generation sees that their ideology is a false idol.

        – Jeff

        Liked by 2 people

        • Tricia says:

          Campus Marxism but unfortunately it doesn’t any there. Good points again Jeff.

          Liked by 1 person

          • (I think your smartphone didn’t realize you meant to type or dictate “it doesn’t end there.”

            Incidentally, to bolster my point that the volatility of the current crop of SJW snowflakes incubating in the leftist university bubble is far worse than any students of the latter half of the 20th century:

            Yesterday my nephew coincidentally sent me a link to an excellent article by Matthew Blackwell, a writer and economics/anthropology student at the University of Queensland. It’s called “The Psychology of Progressive Hostility.” Here’s an excerpt:

            Outbursts of emotional hostility from progressive activists – now described as Social Justice Warriors or SJWs – have come to be known as getting ‘triggered.’ This term originally applied to sufferers of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, but activists have adopted it to describe the anxiety and discomfort they experience when they are exposed to views with which they disagree. “Fu** free speech!” one group of social justice advocates recently told Vice Media, as if this justified the growing belief among university students that conservatives should be prevented from speaking on college campuses. It’s no secret that, with the rise of the triggered progressive, university professors are increasingly intimidated by their own students. An illustrative example of this alarming trend was provided by the hoards of screaming students who surrounded the distinguished Yale sociologist Nicholas Christakis and demanded his head (which they duly received). Christakis had made the mistake of defending an email his wife had written gently criticizing Yale’s attempts to regulate students’ Halloween costumes. “Who the fu** hired you?!” screamed one irate student in response. “You should step down!”

            – Jeff

            Liked by 1 person

          • I guess it’s a perspective thing because I see nothing but vehement hostility from the right wing conservatives (OMG the blogs are just amazing in their attacks).. rather because the Conservatives.. include all the nationalsitic sub-sets.. like rascism, neo-nazis, KKK, frothing-at-the-mouth Second Amendmentists, and other extreme groups. Just the other day I was blog-talking to some conservative.. civilly I had thought… and I asked him if he’d go along with some level of political compromise from Congress on the more popular issues. “F**k you buddy.. it’s all or nothing!”
            I mean, c’mon.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Tricia says:

            Doug, can your provide any examples of conservatives who are frothing at the mouth racists KKK Neo Nazis? Also, let’s review about actions as opposed to words. Don’t you think that a group who wants to prevent people from speaking supposedly offensive things and in some cases jail those who think differently on politics (google the far left and environmentalism for that) speaks more to a Totalitarian bent than anyone on the far right who basically wants to leave you alone does?

            Like

          • To be accurate, it was frothing-at-the-mouth Second Amendmentists, the KKK, neo-nazis, et al.; what’s normally attributed to (ultra)right-wing conservatism. But you make my point.. all a matter of perspective… but it’s divided the country to a point where either side wants to “win” something without compromise.

            Like

          • Tricia says:

            Doug, it’s not just a matter of perspective to claim ultra right wing conservatism is associated with the kkk and Nazis. It’s just wrong and factually so too.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Tricia says:

            I did mean that thanks Jeff! I need to start wearing my reading glasses more often when on WP.

            The Christakis episode is a pathetic and foreboding event in today’s culture wars. I hope we rise above it but I’m not so enthusiastic. Doug you need to read up on stuff like this. You seem like a smart, dare I say tough old bird who would be a natural fit with libertarianism and perhaps, gasp, maybe many conservative views. Your allegiance to liberal beliefs is preventing you from seeing things clearly though. The liberal party of your youth is long gone.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug, as you know, there are all kinds of people across the broad political spectrum, including certifiable loons at the extremes. If I spent time reaching out with a long stick to poke into the nest of ideological groups that are as faaaaaaar away from my viewpoint as possible, it wouldn’t surprise me if I got cursed at too. But I wouldn’t use that to characterize the tone of the other 80% of the public discourse, as it seems like you’re doing.

            – Jeff

            Liked by 1 person

  4. Right on target. Listening to it now. The hammer has met the nail. We must all speak up. In Jesus, we have been liberated and we are not victims.

    Be blessed.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. madblog says:

    Well said Tricia. I haven’t watched it yet but I suspect your take is right on.
    You know, EVERYONE has a hard time in life. To imagine that some people get to skate through life problem-free (and you don’t) is to think that there is some Cosmic Prankster running the universe and actually going to the trouble to mount a conspiracy against you. It doesn’t make a lot of sense. And the people cashing in on all this victimhood thinking get to exert some degree of societal control over the willing recipients of their largesse.
    Life is trouble, man is born to trouble, things happen. Everyone hurts but mostly we keep it to ourselves, or we used to. I have never thought that I was at the short end of anything because I was female; neither have I seen much privilege because I am white and middle-class. Where is all this privileg-a-fying going on anyway?

    Liked by 3 people

    • Tricia says:

      Lol mb, I’d like to find some of that privilege too! You hit on an important point about the victimhood industry as there are a lot of people cashing in on it and it sure DOES bring them a sense of control. Identity too as they take on savior status.

      We are all individuals with unique problems like you said, whether rich, poor, black white or whatever…..The thing that bugs me most about identity politics is it robs us of our individual humanity. I think some are just fine with that unfortunately as it makes it easier to demonize and stereotype a group of people as opposed to a single person with real thoughts, life experience and feelings.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Elihu says:

    I’ve been thinking many of these thoughts, Tricia. When I was in high school, racism didn’t seem nearly as bad as it is today. Racism has always existed, but it felt like we had progressed to a good point. Nearly 10 years ago we got a leader who decide to fan the flames of racism and class warfare and boom—here we are today.

    People who worry obsessively about racism and sexism see racism and sexism in the most innocent of motives.

    As regards a victimhood mentality, Jesus points us away from victimhood to victory. Even if we are oppressed and abused we are supposed to keep doing right instead of focusing on how we’ve been wronged. Complaining actually requires the brain, exacerbating the entitled mindset.

    Thanks for sharing this video!

    Liked by 5 people

    • Tricia says:

      I feel the same way Elihu about racism when I was in school! Of course it existed then and it does today to some extent, but we were making progress. Heck we still are but unfortunately that person you mentioned and the political party he led decided dividing us up in to good and bad groups would benefit them politically and thus resentment and anger between races/sexes has only gotten worse.

      I have experienced some sexism as a woman along with unwanted and obnoxious advances, but you know what? I never let that get in my way, in fact it only makes me compete harder and be stronger. Most women my age or older feel this way too, it’s this younger generation I really worry about.

      Thanks for coming by!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I find it interesting that, as you allude Tricia, here we have college kids who are expressing their lamentations—to be able to be in college in the first place is no small bag of cheap peanuts so to hear complaints from these kids rings a bit hollow to me.
    I also don’t think that because of the obvious fact being that Western Civilization was indeed built predominately, as these young women point out, by White males that society is to now apologize for a historical fact—roles for both men and women have slowly morphed and evolved over time…what is now was not then…and that’s ok because it was then and obviously not now—two distinct times. The fact that so many of folks, mainly the more youthful, today demand some sort of apology from today’s living regarding the past’s long dead is ludicrous.
    Thank you for sharing!

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Reblogged this on Thoughts on culture, politics and more and commented:
    Excellent post and video. I highly recommend watching the video. Long but worth it. Thanks Tricia!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. This one is definitely worth watching from start to finish. I had to watch the second part (with the two male students) twice because I was just so impressed with them, their good sense, their ability to think independently rather than just spouting the leftist SJW clichés they’ve been hearing for years, and their refusal to let victim mentality poison their minds and hearts. The young black man was especially impressive, especially considering where he came from; he could so easily have ended up another depressing statistic, but he refused to do so. I wanted to give him a standing ovation!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Tricia says:

      A standing ovation from me too BB! I also had to watch some segments more than once, it really was just stunning to note the differences between thinking processes.

      Liked by 1 person

      • The differences between thinking processes can be summed up easily: the two young men were actually thinking, while the two girls (can’t even bring myself to call them women) were feeling. They FEEL oppressed. They FEEL like they’ve been given the shaft. They FEEL hopeless because of white male privilege, patriarchy, dead white european males, toxic masculinity, or whatever the cliché du jour happens to be. No doubt they have had some frustrations and disappointments in their lives — who hasn’t? But instead of learning from their experiences and making up their minds not to allow whatever obstacles they confront to keep them from being successful and happy and leading meaningful lives, they whine and rail against white male privilege, patriarchy, etc., and demand that government do something about it. They are utterly pathetic.

        Meanwhile, the young men acknowledge the obstacles they have had to overcome with complete honesty and a healthy dose of good humor, and then they refuse to allow those obstacles to prevent them reaching their goals. Part of me wishes the girls had stuck around to listen to what they boys had to say, but part of me is pretty sure it never would have penetrated their thick skulls.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Tricia says:

          Exactly BB. It would have been great theater too if the girls had stuck around, but you’re right, nothing would have sunk in.

          Like

        • Citizen Tom says:

          That young black guy was older. Anyone who spends nine years in the USAF is going to become more mature. What he deserves credit for is making the effort and persevering. Not a trivial thing.

          The two girls? Unfortunately, college is too much like a more academically challenging high school. The fact that the professors promote Liberal Democrat victim/identify politics just provides an excuse not to deal with the problems of maturation.

          Consider.

          James 1:22-25 New King James Version (NKJV)

          22 But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves. 23 For if anyone is a hearer of the word and not a doer, he is like a man observing his natural face in a mirror; 24 for he observes himself, goes away, and immediately forgets what kind of man he was. 25 But he who looks into the perfect law of liberty and continues in it, and is not a forgetful hearer but a doer of the work, this one will be blessed in what he does.

          At some point that black guy looked at himself and saw himself. That requires honesty and courage, but we cannot change ourselves for the better until we understand what is broken.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Tricia says:

            Very true Tom. College used to be about expanding the mind and challenging yourself, now that’s considered offensive and unsafe.

            But yes, viewing the brokenness of oneself is the only true way forward. Thanks for sharing that.

            Liked by 1 person

  10. p.s. You need to correct an error in your first paragraph — it should read “Steven Crowder” — and then delete this comment. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Wally Fry says:

    Great post, as always Tricia. This is slightly off topic but I am prowling the internet in search of a wise one to explain something to me. Somehow yesterday I found myself on a blog and the post author was encouraging women to “reclaim their masculinity.”

    I don’t even understand that.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Tricia says:

      Omg, seriously Wally? I too have no idea what that means but it sure is funny!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Wally, I listen to every podcast of both Andrew Klavan (4/week) and Ben Shapiro (5/week) (at DailyWire dot com). From those, I’ve learned that the current version of feminism is called 3rd-wave feminism.

      First wave was in the 60s and 70s, and it was good for America and Western culture in general: Stop overt discrimination on the basis of sex. Equal opportunity, etc. Breaking down the good-ol-boy culture in the workplace. Eliminate outright disrespect and harassment/intimidation and promoting men over equally-qualified, equally-performing women. Good stuff.

      Second wave started to go off the rails: it pushed the idea that women don’t need men in their lives. That they can lead independent lives without any dependence on males. That was bad for the family structure, and therefore bad for the tradition of child-rearing, and a bad atmosphere for child-rearing in single-parent households.

      Third wave is absurd: it’s pushing the militaristic feminist claim that women and men are utterly equal. That any notion of different gender roles and traits are fictitious and oppressive. I’ve never viewed it, but Andrew Klavan frequently mentions and quotes passages from a website called Everyday Feminism. The writers there are apparently fully immersed in this secular cult of 3rd-wave feminism, and it is bat-poop craziness.

      Anyway, perhaps the notion of “reclaiming their masculinity” comes from the 3rd-wave feminist doctrine that women should never allow themselves to appear or even feel different than men. But since they ARE biologically different in their brain styles and basic instincts, these fanatical feminists have to struggle mightily to suppress that reality by putting on a manufactured act of masculinity. Dennis Prager often points out how tragically ironic it is that the more these 3rd-wave feminist fanatics revolt against the reality of human nature, the UNhappier they become.

      – Jeff

      Liked by 1 person

    • I agree, Wally. In fact.. I’ve seen some women who could very likely answer your question. 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

  12. Al says:

    Can’t help but see the irony of an obviously minority woman at a university (which will avail her of many new and better opportunities) saying white male privilege still affects her life.

    Thankfully, the black male had a critical-thinking mind to use rather than a mantra.

    The whole video reminds me of the adage: “whether you think you can or you think you can’t; you’re probably right.”

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Change scares people regardless of whether it causes greater benefits or greater harms. I believe a nation born out of oppression (American Revolution) is likely destined to repeat the SAME (or similar) MISTAKES in a cyclical fashion. Just like the stock market, different asset classifications come in and out of favor. So too does social issues and outcomes. Although I agree we should respectfully fight for what we believe is in the best interests of our nation, we must learn to accept compromises along the way.

    In the 1960’s civil rights and liberties was a priority on the “agenda.” Society (often unwillingly) slowly began accepting changes regardless of personal beliefs. These actions created positive AND negative outcomes. African Americans gained greater rights adding credibility to our Declaration Of Independence stating, “All men are created equal…” This positive change was achieved through TANGIBLE measures (legislative actions and changes in law.) Emotional hatred stemming from racism, however, continued to live on. The emotional component of inequality cannot be legislated into laws. Our media reinforces this emotional divide (whether intentionally or unintentionally) to gain viewership and ratings. This is easily proven with two simple questions:
    1. Which two of the 50 states does the media typically identify with “gun violence”? ANS: Michigan and Illinois (The cities within these states would be Detroit and Chicago respectively.)
    2. What race is usually associated with these “acts of violence”. ANS: African Americans

    In REALITY, Alaska, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana are rated 1-6 for firearm deaths (per 100,000 population.) 26 states have higher gun mortality statistics than Michigan and 32 states have higher gun mortality statistics than Illinois.¹ Alaska (the #1 rated state for gun mortality has a race distribution percentage as follows:
    Approximately: 66.1% Caucasian, 3.8% African American, 15.2% American Indian, 6.3% Asian, 1.3% Native Hawaiian, 7.0% Hispanic or Latino²

    Why then, does the media focus so much of their attention on gun violence among African Americans in Detroit, Michigan and Chicago, Illinois?

    This is only 1 example of many reinforcing an agenda promoting an intentional false narrative. I am NOT a conspiracy theorist, but do believe that personal biases based on emotions rather than REALITY, create ongoing turmoil that “stabilizes” INSTABILITY in an effort to (basically) slow down the process of CHANGE (which, in turn, would create greater opportunity for ALL.) This, however, is also used by racial, ethnic and gender groups and organizations that also play on EMOTIONS designed to create further divisiveness.

    Whether it’s race or gender or ethnicity, etc… history will likely “recycle” emotional levels of outrage that will ultimately lead to various compromises and changes. The process is slow because the different races, genders and ethnicities often believe their individual “beliefs” need to be accepted and IMPOSED on all others. As emotions heighten over time, accusations rather than dialogue is chosen as a means to achieving “results.” Until we are willing to LISTEN and UNDERSTAND the NEEDS of our fellow men and women creating a unified foundation to build upon, we will repeat these mistakes over and over again. Our individual races, genders and ethnicities aren’t willing to look at the needs of SOCIETY as a whole FIRST, before looking at their own individual needs. It requires TRUST, HONEST INTENT and COMPROMISE; three traits our society verbally promotes without a willingness to implement.
    REFERENCES:
    ¹ https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/firearm_mortality/firearm.htm
    ² https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/AK

    Liked by 1 person

    • Tricia says:

      I too believe strongly Jonathan that personal biases based on emotion contribute greatly to chaos and instability. We all have those biases to some extent and it’s one of life’s eternal struggles to continually check your thoughts and belief pattens against reality and make changes where needed. It’s impossible to do this though if you’re constantly being told that unfairness is due to others holding you back. One of the many great things you do with your blog is point out the freedom that can be instantly obtained by acknowledging this and personal taking responsibility for your own health.

      I agree too that looking out for societal needs as a whole is important, but I don’t think this is even possible without recognizing yourself as a free individual and the unique talents, life experience and traits, etc… assigned to you, in my opinion, by God. Identity politics turns all of that on its head by signing group characteristics and pitting them against one another and completely canceling out the importance of the individual. It’s really a work of evil.

      I’m not a conspiracy person either but I do believe the media loves ratings and benefits during chaos and so the misrepresentations will continue indefinitely. Interesting links about gun mortality rates too, but one small quibble. Something like 60% of all gun deaths are suicides which accounts for the majority of gun deaths in Alaska. They have high gun homicide rates too but not proportionally as much as Chicago which of course has way stricter gun laws than AK. Now high rates of suicide are something to care about too but I think it’s important to treat that separately than gun homicides.

      As always, thank you for your enlightening comments Jonathan!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thank you Tricia. Just wanted to clarify that I agree with you regarding the facts about guns and deaths vs. homicides. The point (I poorly worded) was to share the media’s focus on gun “deaths”. I would bet the average person thinks (based on media reporting) that Michigan and Illinois have the highest rates of gun “deaths” (regardless of how these deaths occurred.)

        I personally believe the media’s narrative intentionally reinforces this inaccurate message making it appear that African Americans are involved in the majority of “shootings” (of any kind) resulting in death. All this does is create additional FEAR that attaches itself to an entire race of people. This unfairly reinforces a stereotype associated with African Americans profiling them as “dangerous murderers” we must fear. This is certainly untrue, yet likely believed by a segment of the population as a result of this type of media reporting.

        As you stated, where is the media coverage reporting the disturbingly high rates of (likely) Caucasian suicides in Alaska (based on race percentages of the population?) If we’re going to attach the word “death” to guns, why make Alaska (a state with the highest rate of gun deaths) an exception.

        It just seems that guns and violence in general, are attached to the African American population by the media with the type of reporting they provide. All this seems to do is add additional FEAR and DIVISIVENESS to existing world in chaos.

        SIDE NOTE: For anyone reading this comment, it is NOT intended to support or oppose gun laws. It is intended to share my view of the media and the impression (I believe) they impose on their viewers.

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Male Privelage is certainly a myth! I wrote about it too!

    Liked by 1 person

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