The Good Thing Harvey Washed Away

It can seem at times that American citizens are continually at war with one another, always fighting over whatever the latest issue of the day is. While it’s true the country is in flux, the majority of people that make it up are good and decent and it’s important to remember that. I thought the author of this post did a great job showing the human side of tragedy and how even a devastating flood like Harvey can bring us together.  Take a jump to her site and read the whole thing.

My Best Laid Plans

There’s not much in the world I can truly say I hate. But I hate Harvey.

We have been sitting here for more hours than I can begin to count being brutally lashed by his seemingly never ending fury. I would be lying if I said it wasn’t scary…terrifying…at times, but we are among the lucky ones. We are safe and dry.


Harvey has taken so much from so many. Homes, lives, hopes, jobs–all washed into the Gulf of Mexico by his relentless anger. As the horrifying images and desperate needs flash across my screen in endless and quick succession, I sit here with tears in my eyes. Where do you begin? I have never felt so helpless. My neighbors are in dire straits and I can’t do anything but pray. It’s a terrible feeling.


Pregnant women and their toddlers stuck on roofs waiting hours upon hours for…

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9 Responses to The Good Thing Harvey Washed Away

  1. I have no idea if this disaster serves to galvanize America or not. I think the tragedy would have to unfold far more to include more of the country.. and I don’t wish the tragedy to get any worse for those folks. Unfortunately a major icon of our current divisiveness still will reside in the White House anyway. We might be better off hoping/praying the personal tragedies become less for the victims.. and the far lasting economic impact on our nation’s economy because of it is manageable.
    In the meantime we truly need to prepare as a nation for future natural and man-made calamities because this isn’t going to diminish.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Tricia says:

    I dunno, I think it’s just nice to take a break from the mosh pit once in awhile and just reflect for a bit on how good people can be to each other.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Citizen Tom says:

    I grew up on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, and I live in League City, TX, where all that rain fell, for four years in the last half of the 80’s. I was down there when Alicia came through. Hurricanes and torrential rains are a way of life down there, but > 40 – 50 inches of rain is just too much.

    Since I had already been through a couple of hurricanes (in Mississippi), I made a point of finding a house on the highest ground I could. Was not easy. That place is flat, but I guess where I lived is still dry. I think it was far enough from a water way, but the flooding is so widespread, it is difficult to get that much detail.

    Not really surprised to see the outpouring of support. The folks around there can identify with that sort of tragedy. Empathy makes it easier to care about someone.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Tricia says:

      40″-50″ IS a ton of rain! I can’t even imagine, we probably get in a decade here in Southern California. I’m not surprised by the people doing good to each other, it’s just nice to see amongst such catastrophe.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Canuck Carl says:

    This really is a great post from a dear blogger is right there is the midst of the devastation. Thank you for reposting this Tricia. It is wonderful to see the stigmas, prejudices and hatred washed away.

    Liked by 1 person

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