BLIND FAITH & FAIRY TALES

A good Saturday read.

Frank's Cottage

Blind faith, Frank's Cottage, faithFar from being upset or offended, when I read this graphic (helpfully posted in an Internet atheist community), I immediately thought of some people I’ve met since 2002, when I became a Christian.

Those people exactly fit what this atheist declared. And it saddens me.

But notice I wrote “some”.  And as the ancient teeny bopper singers The Osmonds sang more than 40 years ago, “one bad apple don’t spoil the whole bunch.”

In other words, to base one’s opinion on an entire faith based on the few people you’ve met is simply ludicrous and utterly without credibility. It would be like me reading news reports, then declaring that all Muslims are violent maniacs. See what I mean?

It’s important to keep this in mind: even if a person is raised by Christian parents to have blind faith, that hardly means that person is simply going to go along with…

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17 Responses to BLIND FAITH & FAIRY TALES

  1. Great post Tricia, thanks. I totally agree with what he said here, “In other words, to base one’s opinion on an entire faith based on the few people you’ve met is simply ludicrous and utterly without credibility.” True, but if you have a lot of experience with the bad apples, it’s going to color people’s perceptions. It’s not rational, probably ludicrous too, but such is the nature of human behavior.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Tricia says:

      That’s very true IB, I’ve certainly done this myself.

      Like

    • I have a somewhat different reaction to the graphic, though it could be considered related:

      When I hear someone say “I am a Christian,” I think, “You’re likely to be a person I have much in common with, politically, ethically, and morally, at least in theory. But I had best be cautious about revealing my own non-theism, as I’ve been attacked many times by people I should be able to count as allies.”

      I am usually careful to demonstrate my credentials as a conservative, so to speak, before the “which sort of Christian are you?” question comes up. And even so, I’ve instantly lost friends over the issue. And you’ve seen me attacked by other conservatives on Citizen Tom’s blog explicitly because of my non-theism. Even he does it, inadvertently, in today’s proclamation (in effect) that all conservatives are Christians.

      A pity, it seems to me. And disappointing.

      Both of you here (including our hostess) know enough of my story and “credentials” so to speak, or I’d not even post this. But what will it cost me among other onlookers?

      (Oho. This was my first comment, but it never got sent until many hours later.)

      ===|==============/ Keith DeHavelle

      Liked by 2 people

      • Tricia says:

        Keith I do know what you mean. I didn’t become a Christian until mid life and so very much understand and sympathize with a non theist view of things. As far as holding the “conservative credential”, I do that too until I know the company I’m keeping and even so I’ve lost friends over it as well. I’ve been doing it less and less though as it gives me more opportunities to explain why I believe what I do in hopes people will realize that you can be on the right without growing horns and a tail. 😉 No one should be attacked for what they believe though. It is a pity indeed.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Dennis says:

    There is some merit in the following: “have blind faith in a fairy tale that was written by people long ago in a book….” I remember questioning the Nuns in my grade school about who it was that wrote the Bible and the answer would always be “very knowledgeable men who knew the story of Jesus.”
    The Bible was written years after Jesus walked the earth, so is everything the truth? Did memories fade or events get embellished?
    I believe blind faith is fine for some folks but as someone in the original post noted, people get angry if you don’t believe as they do or you question their beliefs. To me ones religion is a very personal thing and should reflect their beliefs and commitment(s). It’s fine to share those beliefs but be prepared for the possibility of a reaction contrary to what you believe and accept that everyone has a free will to choose religion as they see fit.
    Too many wars have been fought and lives lost due to religious differences. Time for that to stop.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hello, Dennis:

      I agree with most of what you’ve written. But your last paragraph I’m inclined to take some issue with, if I may.

      Of course, if even one war were fought over “religious differences,” that would arguably be “too many” — though the concept of “just war” would warrant discussion in such a context. I accept that the score is “at least one.” But it has long seemed to me that “religious differences” is too often a shorthand for nearly any context for war.

      One very current example is jihad, going on in countless countries to various extents. Yes, jihad is driven by one religion, Islam, but it is against all others, from completely secular peoples to those who simply hold a slightly different variation of Islamic tenets. A religion, an arguably bad one, is fairly blamable for this conflict, but those on the other side being lumped into the blame list by the phrase “religious differences” seems unfair to me.

      Many past wars have leaned upon religion to justify a war that they already wished to wage for rather secular reasons. It is rare that religion is the source motivation for war, jihad excepted. Even Hitler has been characterized as “a Christian waging a war using religious justifications” which seems laughable to anyone familiar with the history and his writings, actions, and evident philosophy. He did indeed make such a reference, as part of a sales pitch, but was very inconstant about what he freely admitted was a political ploy.

      Other leaders going back in history have similar spotty histories on the “religious differences” supporting their planned attacks. Even the the Crusades had a lot of background of conquest and slaughter they were reacting to, as poor as the reaction sometimes was (though savagery was unremarkable for the times, sadly — look what the English did to their own criminals).

      Similar to the “religious differences” catch-all, the “all religions are equally bad” meme gets too much credit, to my mind. I note that “Christian terrorists” were responsible for tens of deaths in the past century (including the abortion clinic bombings), whereas jihadists get that many killings of innocent non-combatants out of the way before breakfast on any given morning. To me, that makes a difference, as does the utter lack of support for the abortion clinic bombers among Christian leaders.

      ===|==============/ Keith DeHavelle

      Liked by 1 person

      • Tricia says:

        That’s interesting Keith what you say about religion being used as a front by people wanting to wage aggression for blatantly non spiritual means. I believe that’s true in most cases, even with today’s radical Jihadists. They quote verses from the Koran and speak of their religious devotion but it seems to me the same old Marxist playbook of wanting power over others. Same with the “Christian” crusades of which, yes were fought in the name of religion but was again pursued by people living very far away from Christ.

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        • Iran was explicitly Marxist, hybridizing that theology into their theocratic scheme. But it seems to me, from a fair amount of reading of translations of Ikhwan (Muslim Brotherhood) material that they really believe the Qur’an and its proclamations about their destiny. Even the ones whose destiny is to die to further the cause believe in it. And this group is behind nearly all the jihad loci in the world, from Hamas to al Qaeda to ISIS to the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR).

          The Saudis supported them for decades, and to an extent still do. But they are coming round to the fact that in the Brotherhood’s theology, the Saudi rulers are dead men and placeholders at best for true Caliphate guides. They take their religion quite seriously, I think.

          As an indication: Ikhwan members attack and kill Coptic Christians (the last remaining true Egyptians) despite the fact that this makes things very difficult politically for the group. Ikhwan spiritual leader Yusuf al-Qaradawi makes pronouncements that, once translated, really make them look murderous despite the risk that their recent welcome in the White House might be harmed as a result. (They didn’t need to worry, it seems.)

          It seems to me that, were they operating from angling for power rather than pursuing theocratic ends, they’d do this differently.

          ===|==============/ Keith DeHavelle

          Liked by 1 person

          • Tricia says:

            Well, that is a good point too because they do indeed want to “convert” infidels, i.e. all other non believers, which is theocratic. In the end it’s about control but I’ll certainly agree it’s religious too.

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    • Tricia says:

      Yes, it’s true Dennis, too many wars have been fought over this religion by people who have perverted the meaning to suit their ends. And people being people will always on some level want others to think as they do. I don’t believe forcing anyone to believe a certain way is ever productive and often brings out behavior that can, at the very least, be called hypocritical. In anything though it does take some blind faith of belief to go deeper, but it’s up to the person to choose just what it is they put their faith in.

      Like

    • It’s true that religious differences and intolerances have been at the root of many deadly conflicts, more’s the pity. But the numbers of people killed in the name of Christianity pale in comparison with the numbers killed in wars and genocides launched by atheist regimes.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. ColorStorm says:

    Hey trish, what did Donny Osmond say to the girl who asked him to prove God, faith, and the scriptures are true?

    Drum roll…………………….ba bada ba………ready?

    ‘Go away little girl………………………..’ 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  4. jncthedc says:

    When it comes to religious beliefs, some believe there are no grey boundaries. I respect everyone’s rights to their beliefs, but insist that those wishing to impose their beliefs value my rights to my beliefs as well. Tolerance is a concept that demonstrates respect and the willingness to communicate rather than impose personal and religious values. If people were just as willing to “open” their ears as they sometimes are their mouths, fewer misinterpretations and misunderstandings would occur. The outcome might be more productive as well. Naturally, this is simply an opinion.
    I enjoyed the article.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Tricia says:

      “If people were just as willing to “open” their ears as they sometimes are their mouths, fewer misinterpretations and misunderstandings would occur. ” Amen too hat Jonathan. Good to see you back too. I hope all is ok. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • jncthedc says:

        My father’s recovery is coming along. The biggest challenge will be keeping him on a path of better lifestyle habits. Keeping the big picture in focus is difficult for an 89 year old person whose stroke significantly impaired his vision.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Tricia says:

          Awww, well I’m sorry you have to go through this but am glad he is recovering. If anyone can help him change his lifestyle habits, it would certainly be you. 🙂 I’ll have to visit your site later, see what’s new.

          Liked by 1 person

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